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The Breasts of Kate Hudson Are Not for Public Consumption

April 19, 2010

Kate Hudson is an okay actress and a great credit to hippies.

The Itty-Bitty Titty Committee has lost one of their own! According to published reports actress Kate Hudson has gotten a boob job and apparently polarized the entire internet. The viewpoints seem to come down to this:

  • Kate is in a business, which trades on physical looks; therefore this is just like a M.D. hopeful going to med school or a bush leaguer taking steroids
  • Kate was fine the way she was and her fake boobs are an abomination to flat chested women everywhere who looked to her for evidence of their own validity as humans and women

Like cosmetic surgery itself, Kate Hudson is one of those issues of which I have no strong opinion. I have seen movies of hers and did not find her to be stinky, obnoxious or unbearable to watch, particularly 200 Cigarettes. I might even find her more likable than her infinitely likable mother. I guess I was a little bummed when her little hippie family broke up; they seemed like a nice enough family to me. Though I was eye rolly about all the fuss made over her kid’s long hair.

Now as far as cosmetic surgery goes, if folks want to turn themselves into cats that’s between them, their licensed trained mental health professional (if they have one) and their surgeon. It’s got nothing to do with me.

I’m more troubled by the message that women’s bodies and choices about those bodies are somehow for media consumption and folks ought to have an opinion and express it in public forums, as though the person under scrutiny is devoid of feelings.

That said, it’s fine to have an opinion, but it’s not fine to then thinking merely having an opinion entitles one to express it and have it added to the discourse on another person’s body. That’s pretty freaking arrogance, regardless if you’re framing it from a “nothing wrong with bigger boobs!” or the quasi-feminist stance, “plastic surgery is problematic”.

If Hudson wants to get boobs implanted all over face, back, legs and arms that might be odd to me, but at the end of the day what she wants to do to her body with her resources is ultimately none of my freaking business.

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27 Comments leave one →
  1. Hsofia permalink
    April 19, 2010 12:14 pm

    This makes me think of inane religious rules like “a woman shall not remove eyebrow hair” or “alter” herself with makeup, etc. yet there are no proclamations against thinking unibrows are gross and in fact beauty is considered a gift from God. In other words, so long as we prize some physical attributes over others, why are we so shocked when some people try to attain them artificially? And why is it so awful to possess artificially what another person has obtained by mere chance?

  2. April 19, 2010 12:18 pm

    And hell, at 31, Kate had a good, long run at ignoring her body snarkers!

  3. msjacks permalink
    April 19, 2010 12:28 pm

    Here’s what I think is worth mentioning- Kate is super rich and can afford to have her purely emotional/societal insecurities ‘fixed’ with plastic surgery, whereas many of my girlfriends or FTM friends who don’t have the piles of money that Kate has don’t get their breast reductions or removals covered by their insurance because they’re “medically obese” (bullshit) or it’s considered a cosmetic procedure, so they have to keep suffering until they can save up their pennies for a procedure they legitimately need.

    Also, if you wanna see Kate stink a movie up, try Bride Wars: http://www.netflix.com/Movie/Bride_Wars/70103758
    Anne Hathaway completely outshines her, plus the whole movie is horrifyingly sexist. A big thumbs down to the both of them for that mess!

  4. April 19, 2010 12:36 pm

    Here’s what I think is worth mentioning- Kate is super rich and can afford to have her purely emotional/societal insecurities ‘fixed’ with plastic surgery, whereas many of my girlfriends or FTM friends who don’t have the piles of money that Kate has don’t get their breast reductions or removals covered by their insurance because they’re “medically obese” (bullshit) or it’s considered a cosmetic procedure, so they have to keep suffering until they can save up their pennies for a procedure they legitimately need.

    Yeah, I’m one of those people who doesn’t qualify for reduction because I won’t starve myself down to 110lbs. Again, the issue of who has access to medical procedures should not be happening on some other woman’s body. Just because she’s rich does not mean she is not a human being nor does it mean her body is someone else’s talking point.

    The conversation regarding medical access is bigger than her B cups and any discussion of her body specifically is irrelevant.

    And given we don’t actually know WHY she opted for surgery, i’m not about to open that can of worms in regards to what is a “legitimate” reason for surgery or what is not, merely based on her being white, cisgendered, abled bodied and wealthy.

  5. April 19, 2010 12:43 pm

    Also, if you wanna see Kate stink a movie up, try Bride Wars: http://www.netflix.com/Movie/Bride_Wars/70103758
    Anne Hathaway completely outshines her, plus the whole movie is horrifyingly sexist. A big thumbs down to the both of them for that mess!

    Well given neither has allowed themselves to be positioned as feminists, I’m not about to condemn the movie – which I have never seen nor intend to. She’s no more stinky than the slew of other actresses that are celebrated on a daily bases right here on Fry Butter. Unless I’m missing something, but given I’m an expert on film, I’m fairly certain I’m not.

    From a film criticism point a few I can think a few actresses far worse than Hudson, namely Tina Fey, who has no range, no ability to demonstrate empathy on screen and cannot write a compelling female character, much less play one.

  6. msjacks permalink
    April 19, 2010 1:00 pm

    Just because she’s rich does not mean she is not a human being nor does it mean her body is someone else’s talking point.

    But when she gets the implants, and her money, because she’s everyone else’s talking point it’s totally relevant. You can’t extrapolate one part of a person and set it on a shelf when they’re deliberately in the public eye. She signed up for this.

    See Bride Wars before you defend it. It’s bad. Plenty of non-feminists were shocked at the epic sexism in that movie.

    Also-
    She’s no more stinky than the slew of other actresses that are celebrated on a daily bases right here on Fry Butter.
    Genuine ouch there.

  7. araymondjohnson permalink
    April 19, 2010 1:23 pm

    No, for real, Bride Wars is really bad. It’s not Kate Hudson’s fault anymore than anyone else though, everyone in that credit stream should be ashamed.

    She is definitely not a superb actor, but she has had her moments. Specifically playing Drew Barrymore in an SNL skit parodying Inside the Actor’s Studio. With the right material and direction, she has enough natural charisma to create better work than many others.

    Having said all that, I am genuinely surprised she got implants. and then I’m surprised that I’m surprised.

  8. April 19, 2010 1:36 pm

    But when she gets the implants, and her money, because she’s everyone else’s talking point it’s totally relevant. You can’t extrapolate one part of a person and set it on a shelf when they’re deliberately in the public eye. She signed up for this.

    I can’t co-sign this, because then it makes it okay to discuss Gabby’s body or the body of a Trans person who might happen transition in the public eye, like say Chaz Bono. It’s a slippery slope and one I’m not inclined to journey down.

  9. April 19, 2010 1:42 pm

    See Bride Wars before you defend it. It’s bad. Plenty of non-feminists were shocked at the epic sexism in that movie.

    Oh I’m sure it is. I just am not sure what relevance it has as to why it’s okay to discuss the body of one of its lead actor.

  10. araymondjohnson permalink
    April 19, 2010 1:54 pm

    I would accept a conversation about this in terms of a career choice, as far as part of larger questioning discussion of compulsory beauty standards, just as I would accept a conversation of Gabby’s body in the context of size discrimination in Hollywood, just as I would accept a conversation of Chaz’s body in the context of trans visibility and representation. But in all cases, I would prefer the conversations to be respectful and accommodating of complications of personal bodies and choices.

    Someone once sent me a link to a snarky blog post about Hillary Swank’s new implants, and I just didn’t get it, I felt sad, not inclined to laugh. I don’t mean sad about her implants, but also sad at the depiction of her decision, and knowing that people were ridiculing on top of it….in the name of feminism, of course.

  11. April 19, 2010 2:06 pm

    Someone once sent me a link to a snarky blog post about Hillary Swank’s new implants, and I just didn’t get it, I felt sad, not inclined to laugh. I don’t mean sad about her implants, but also sad at the depiction of her decision, and knowing that people were ridiculing on top of it….in the name of feminism, of course.

    That’s really sad, Raymond. It should be noted that both actresses are entering the “district attorney” era of their careers!

  12. msjacks permalink
    April 19, 2010 2:28 pm

    it makes it okay to discuss Gabby’s body or the body of a Trans person who might happen transition in the public eye, like say Chaz Bono.

    But there’s good and bad discussion. Like, we’ve had plenty of good discussions about Gabby’s body here. Somebody’s gotta defend her, after all. And didn’t you discuss Kate Hudson’s body by blogging about it? If you didn’t want us to discuss her, why didn’t you close comments?

  13. msjacks permalink
    April 19, 2010 2:30 pm

    I like what Ray said in his last comment. I’ll just leave it at that. No one is immune. No one! But everybody deserves respect, especially in regards to what is personal.

  14. April 19, 2010 2:31 pm

    I was once approached by a friend, a woman whose 19 year old daughter had been a member of the youth group I advised. The daughter, who was now on her own, was getting a boob job, and the mother looked to me for help as to how to react/respond to this. After a little thought I told her that she could look at it as another form of body modification like tattoos and piercings, that it probably wasn’t harmful, and that in any case her daughter had the right to make decisions about her own body. I suggested she be supportive even if she didn’t think it was a good idea or necessary.

    I feel the same about Ms. Hudson’s case: it’s her body, and her money.

  15. April 19, 2010 3:23 pm

    But there’s good and bad discussion. Like, we’ve had plenty of good discussions about Gabby’s body here. Somebody’s gotta defend her, after all. And didn’t you discuss Kate Hudson’s body by blogging about it? If you didn’t want us to discuss her, why didn’t you close comments?

    I think you’re conflating things here. I wrote a piece stating I didn’t think it was appropriate to make other people’s bodies discourse, utilizing a current news item: Hudson’s breast job. I did not then begin sorting folks by class privilege, race, gender identity into groups who can be discussed (those with more privilege) and who cannot be discussed (those with less privilege) which you have done here by suggesting that rich white women do not have body agency merely because they are rich and white.

    I made no judgments, prescribed no treatments or gave no perspective on THE BREASTS themselves or the decision to get the surgery, only addressing them in the context of what I find problematic about how women’s bodies are discussed and viewed as public property in the media.

  16. April 19, 2010 3:28 pm

    a) I know plenty of fat, poor, trans people who have been able to get top surgery. Just because there are some that have been turned down has nothing to do with Kate Hudson being able to afford plastic surgery. Kate Hudson is not preventing fat or trans people from getting plastic surgery. You should be mad at the medical establishment, not a celebrity.

    b) Never seen Bride Wars, but being in a shitty sexist movie isn’t signing a contract saying “Go ahead and talk shit about my body”.

    c) Because Kate Hudson is rich, thin, and white she doesn’t deserve to be defended from negative comments about her body? She’s also a woman, and still subject to sexism. Every woman deserves to be defended from negative comments about her body. Advocating anything else is antithetical to the tenets of feminism.

    d) I don’t think Snarky was saying you can’t discuss women’s bodies at all, she’s saying we shouldn’t pass judgment on women’s bodies or what they choose to do with their bodies. Defending Gabby against fatphobic comments is protecting her choice of what to do with her body. Just as defending Kate Hudson’s decision to get breast implants is protecting her choice of what to do with her body.

  17. msjacks permalink
    April 19, 2010 4:58 pm

    Whoa whoa now ladies, WHOA WHOA. In no way, shape or form did I ever say that someone being in a shitty movie means that they deserve to have their bodies and personal choices be criticized. It was just an “As an aside, have you seen Bride Wars? What an awful movie that was.” There was never any connection made between her body, this/any discussion about it, and Bride Wars. Please reread; I think that is pretty clear. If it’s not clear, sorry, I suppose I should have made it more so. But if it’s just that it was unclear- since you know me and all, please do not assume that I would be so horrible of a person that I would think that it’s okay to rake someone over the coals for having breast implants just because they’re in a bad movie.

    As for the rest of it, this is where we will just have to agree to disagree and leave it at that. I just don’t have the same amount of sympathy/empathy/caring/whatever for people who get optional plastic surgery and are mocked for it, and don’t get why anybody makes a fuss about it. I don’t have a lot of space in my life to feel bad for Kate Hudson because people are mad at her for having breast implants. Now when they were mocking her for having small breasts, that was the very definition of mean.

    *edited for HTML

  18. April 19, 2010 5:56 pm

    I just don’t have the same amount of sympathy/empathy/caring/whatever for people who get optional plastic surgery and are mocked for it, and don’t get why anybody makes a fuss about it.

    You realize this train heads right to Trans and Ableism town, right? Unless your vital organs are in acute distress, all surgery is elective.

    So basically you’re telling the world it’s okay to question and mock your life style choices simply because they don’t like you. And that’s cool, just be prepared to eat your own cooking.

  19. msjacks permalink
    April 19, 2010 6:19 pm

    And since you’re all about some Fey who is a well known racist, sizeist, fatphobic, classist anti-feminist person (don’t worry the transphobia and ableism is on its way) you should be grateful for feminists like me who won’t even let folks talk crap like this about YOU.

    Wow. I’m not even sure if this is worth responding to. Besides the fact that it’s not true- I’m not supporting anyone’s right to mock someone for having cosmetic surgery, I’m supporting someone’s right to be offended by its existence- everything you said was pretty mean and unnecessary. If you are still pissed about the Tina Fey thing from over a week ago you can talk to me about it via chat or email. I’m not really sure where this is coming from- I’m not “all about some Fey”. But I’m also not going to allow you to crucify me because I don’t 100% hate her. I’m allowed to have complicated feelings about a public person. It’s part of life. If you “love me like whoa” you’re definitely not treating me accordingly. In fact, you’re coming across to me like a bully.

    And yeah, I do think there’s a big ethical and medical line between a FTM guy having top surgery and Kate Hudson getting her boobies done up. I’m not convinced that top surgery is “optional”, and that having to live without it doesn’t constitute “dying on a table” in some way, shape or form. I stand by that 100%.

  20. April 19, 2010 6:28 pm

    Wow. I’m not even sure if this is worth responding to. Besides the fact that it’s not true- I’m not supporting anyone’s right to mock someone for having cosmetic surgery, I’m supporting someone’s right to be offended by its existence- everything you said was pretty mean and unnecessary

    Robin, you said it was okay to mock Kate Hudson’s choice for having cosmetic surgery.

    And yeah, I do think there’s a big ethical and medical line between a FTM guy having top surgery and Kate Hudson getting her boobies done up. I’m not convinced that top surgery is “optional”, and that having to live without it doesn’t constitute “dying on a table” in some way, shape or form. I stand by that 100%.

    Actually, that’s where you’re wrong. Any surgery that’s not life saving in nature in a medical sense is considered elective. It has nothing to do with how you or I define these terms. Check out any medical textbook. That’s why I have a problem with your whole line of reasoning. You don’t get to pick and choose on this issue. It’s why is so fucking important not to play the “legitimate” versus fatuous game in terms of surgery. Because gets whose gonna get screwed?

    It’s not gonna be Kate Hudson.

  21. April 19, 2010 6:30 pm

    I’m not “all about some Fey”. But I’m also not going to allow you to crucify me because I don’t 100% hate her. I’m allowed to have complicated feelings about a public person. It’s part of life. If you “love me like whoa” you’re definitely not treating me accordingly. In fact, you’re coming across to me like a bully.

    And you’re coming across anti-feminist which since this blog has my name on it doesn’t really work for me. There’s does that clear this all up for you.

  22. April 19, 2010 6:37 pm

    I just don’t understand why we can’t agree that it’s not anyone’s place to judge what any woman does with her body.

  23. April 19, 2010 6:55 pm

    “I just don’t understand why we can’t agree that it’s not anyone’s place to judge what any woman does with her body.”

    This boils it down just right for me.

  24. April 19, 2010 7:00 pm

    Robin, seriously, give it a rest. Yes, I took it down because I was trying to spare your feelings. I’ve opted to fwd all the hate mail directed at you and your posts so you can just get over yourself.

  25. hsofia permalink
    April 20, 2010 12:18 am

    Bride Wars astounded me in the first fifteen minutes with its insulting depiction of women, female friendships, and marriage. And it just went on and on … It tries to corrects itself in the last 20 minutes or so, but … wow. I wouldn’t let anyone under the age of 30 watch that movie without having read a primary text on patriarchy; it is all kinds of wahtthefack?!

  26. April 20, 2010 12:40 am

    Yeah it sounds like a real stinker. Glad I missed it.

  27. April 20, 2010 1:51 am

    b) Never seen Bride Wars, but being in a shitty sexist movie isn’t signing a contract saying “Go ahead and talk shit about my body”.

    c) Because Kate Hudson is rich, thin, and white she doesn’t deserve to be defended from negative comments about her body? She’s also a woman, and still subject to sexism. Every woman deserves to be defended from negative comments about her body. Advocating anything else is antithetical to the tenets of feminism.

    1000x this. Some folks really need to reread what is meant by the word “feminist” before they start flapping their ignorant gums. Feminism should ensure that women have agency around their bodies and regardless of whether or not we believe those choices are valid, reasonable or would make them ourselves.

    Setting up a dichotomy of good/bad surgery only ensures folks who lack agency due to class, race, gender identity or ability status are the ones who will be hurt the most. Not those with the most privilege. Going down that road, like what’s being done here is very, very dangerous.

    Not sure why this is a hard concept to grasp, but selective feminists often lack the nuance to conceptualized issues that aren’t black and white and seek to essentialize experiences rather than examine them from a perspective not clouded by their own biases and privileges.

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